Adoption: The Gift That Keeps Giving

As a self-proclaimed (and friend-agreed) crazy cat lady, I honestly didn’t think I’d adopt an animal until I was in the “adult” stage of life – aka. I’d own a home, be married and maybe have a kid or two.

Basically, I figured I needed to have my life in order and settled before I even thought about bringing in another living thing. I took the old cliche “You can’t love somebody else until you learn to love yourself” to heart. How could I provide the love and attention an animal needed when I couldn’t even figure out what I needed in life?

But if I’m being honest (and for better or for worse, I always am on Live Inspired) then I must admit that things didn’t work out that way – four years ago today, I adopted an abandoned cat named Twiggy through a rescue website.

When I adopted her, I was living and working in the tiniest little one-bedroom apartment, eating ramen noodles and working a job that I enjoyed but didn’t afford me many luxuries. I was happy but I wasn’t “settled” in any way, shape or form. In fact, I was lonely most of the time and I wasn’t sure where I’d end up a year or two down the road.

That’s why when I was performing my nightly post-work ritual of perusing adoption websites, I was only partially serious about finding a furever buddy. Well, I was only partially serious until I saw Twiggy’s page.

I’m still unsure as to why I inquired about her instead of the other hundreds of cats I looked at over the past 6-12 months but I did. I knew that I needed to have this “talkative” black cat in my life.

After three phone interviews, a visit to her foster home, a few panic attacks and some ugly-cries later, I fell in love with that little furball.

Being a kitty mom wasn’t easy, especially as I was scraping by on my bills. She has special dietary needs and her food cost about $40-70 per bag. She meowed so loud every night and she woke me up almost every morning. She kicks her litter everywhere and she throws up hairballs more often than I’d like.

But those little “negatives” don’t matter at all when I think about the joy she brings myself, my family and my friends. She always seems to find my lap when I’m stressed out or crying. She’s been by my side through breakups, lay offs and cross-state moves. She poses for numerous (… hundreds?) of photos and even looks cute as Snapchat Disney princesses.

Simply said – I’m not sure who saved who.

Adopting an animal in need has changed my life in the most incredible of ways. If you’re considering adding a pet to your life or to your household, please please pleaaaaaase consider adoption.

According to ASPCA:

  • Approximately 7.6 million companion animals enter animal shelters nationwide every year. Of those, approximately 3.9 million are dogs and 3.4 million are cats.
  • Each year, approximately 2.7 million animals are euthanized (1.2 million dogs and 1.4 million cats).
  • Approximately 2.7 million shelter animals are adopted each year (1.4 million dogs and 1.3 million cats).
  • Of the dogs entering shelters, approximately 35% are adopted, 31% are euthanized and 26% of dogs who came in as strays are returned to their owner.
  • Of the cats entering shelters, approximately 37% are adopted, 41% are euthanized, and less than 5% of cats who came in as strays are returned to their owners.
    If you can emotionally and financially afford to give a home to an animal in need, please do. There are so many animals in desperate need of love and if you can provide a caring home, they’ll change your life.
      For Twiggy’s 5th birthday, do us both a favor and start your research here:

The Humane Society
ASPCA

 

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